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The Glove Confusion

Marc Jacobs knit gloves AW13

Marc Jacobs AW13

So you have to start knitting gloves at some point don’t you? Well to be honest, they always made me a bit nervous. You always see people with a handful of DPNs and such little rounds with a ton of loose ends and contrast yarn all over their samples……. frightening!Well I couldn’t avoid them any more.

Gloves were such a prominent feature on the AW13 catwalks that I just had to bite the DPN bullet and get in there. To be fair, I probably should have started with something a little less ambitious but you know me…. all fashion and no fear, plus the Marc Jacobs gloves with the mesh effect were such a key trend find and something I was dying to try.

So like a knitting fiend I went off and designed and swatched. A few hours later and with some glove making research under my hat, before I jumped in,  I managed to find a great video on YouTube [where else]by VeryPink Knits. Well it seems to me that actually, the ” knitting the gloves ” bit is actually really easy. The only hard bit is knowing all of the tricks to get them looking perfect as you go along. The video was really helpful and not the only one on knitting gloves, so you can find others that you prefer, but I wanted to list a few more tricks I learnt and a few adjustments to the tips that I have found making the gloves.

Now on the video, Staci from VeryPink Knits takes you through one of her knitting patterns for basic gloves, which of course you have to buy if you want to follow the video tutorial perfectly. However as a designer this bit didn’t bother me. As you follow the step by step video, each of the 9 glove knitting steps will focus on a different element of making the gloves which is great, but there were a few elements that I came across that I would and did change for my own pattern through trial and error.

The basic glove is pretty straight forward and it’s only when you get to the fingers that all of these tips really come into work. For example, on the video, Staci suggests linking the first and second finger together by picking up 1 stitch in between. Well I was knitting on 4mm needles and 1 stitch didn’t look right or fit well. Instead. as I started to knit each finger, I cast on 2 stitches each end of the round [ the bit that will make the space between 2 fingers ]. It gave me a little flat part as I knitted in the round and sat much flatter when I was trying them on. As I moved onto finger 2 it was easy enough to pick up these stitches to again make 2 additional stitches in between the front and the back of the finger. It also fit much better with 2 stitches rather than just the one. When I tried 1 stitch, I found I was getting a lot of holes where the yarn was stretching and the fit was way too tight. I wouldn’t do this at the edges of the gloves though as it will puff out the finger and look very odd.

Another point was to slip the stitches off onto contrast waste yarn when they are not in use. This is great if you want to try the gloves on, but actually if you are knitting any kind of texture like I was or with a combination of more than 1 yarn, again like mine, the contrast yarn was getting lost when I placed the stitches back on the needle and I ended up having to frog a lot of rows, just to salvage the textured stitch. I actually use this method in a lot of other projects and designs, but for some reason with gloves, it just didn’t help. My suggestion is to use either a couple of larger holding needles/stitch holders or a few smaller ones. This will give you a very clear picture of where your stitches are at all times.

My other suggestion on this same point is that I bought 2 sets of 4mm dpns so that I could also leave the stitches not being used on them whilst I knitted each finger with the others. You have to add and remove the stitches quite a bit, so this sped up my process of knitting, but you do have to be careful they don’t fall off.

My glove journey continues but I’ll keep you updated on the progress and anymore tips I come across as I go. Here is the link to the VeryPink video if you want to knit along: http://youtu.be/L6ODA0nfIIE

 Twisted Angle knitting gloves for beginners.

 

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HELP: Needle & Yarn gauge

A free needle size and yarn guide for hand knitters. Download the guide for freeHave a little guide to your needle size and the type of yarns per needle.

Some fashionknitsters, especially when you start knitting can be a little confused by the tons of different types of yarn, plus the fact that there are loads of different sizing systems for the needles themselves. Who can blame them? I think we all [and still are] went through it. It’s daunting right?

So here is something really simple…… The only things you need to do is

 1. Download the pdf,

 2. Print it at 100% [That’s really important] and

 3. Then share it with others!
So now you’ve got it, here’s how to use it. The reason you have to print the guide at 100% is so that the images of the needles are an accurate size when printed out. So easy peasy, just take your knitting needle and lay it under the images to find it’s size. It will fit perfectly if the size is accurate. Now you are probably thinking ”under?” Yep try putting the needle on top of each image. It’s a bit tricky to see the image underneath, but if you line up your knitting needle underneath the paper, you’ll be able to see if the width of needle is the same as the width of the needle image. Make sense?

Now here’s a tip….. if putting it underneath isn’t precise enough for you, you can use the printed needle images to do something more. With some see-through sticky tape, cover each edge of the A4 piece of paper with the needle ends on the front and back, so basically top and bottom. Put a couple of strips on so that the edges are sturdy. Now with each needle image,  cut the edge of each one so that it makes a little cutout of the ends of each needle that looks like a notch. Be really careful to keep them accurate, but you can put the needle in the notch. You’ll soon know if it’s too big or too small.Needle-gauge3

If you would like a little pocket, A5 sized, printed card version of one of these gauges, you can purchase them from our shop. Just click here to buy

Download PDF HERE: needle guage

 

SHARE THE KNITTY LOVE: These guides are all free and here to help you. Share the love. Click the buttons below to tell someone about it or leave me a comment below to tell me what you think. I’d love to hear your thoughts.

 

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HELP: Calculate your yarn

Ever wanted to know how to calculate the amount of yarn you need for your knitting project or designA while ago, I was asked if  I could calculate some yarn for someone and after I did, I came up with an idea. What if I asked knitters if there was something knit related that was a bit of a mystery. Something people wanted a guide to or if I could help with a knitting problem…..

One of the most popular responses was the question “How do I calculate yarn?” So I thought it would be a good idea to make it into a guide, a free guide.

There are so many knitters who need to adapt patterns, sizing for example or those who design patterns and the problem was that all of the other ones on the web seemed really complicated.  So I’ve put together a really simple step by step guide that takes you through the entire process. The tension swatch, the design of the pattern and even a couple of methods of calculation that gives you a basic estimate right through to a detailed part for those who want precise measurements.

Now I can’t pretend that the process is a really quick one, you so have to knit a swatch and look through your pattern if it’s an existing one, but it is simple.

So if you need to calculate the amount of yarn you need for a project , designed something or want to know how much you need for a specific size, you can download this guide below.

Download PDF HERE: Calculating yarn

 

SHARE THE KNITTY LOVE: These guides are all free and here to help you. Share the love. Click the buttons below to tell someone about it or leave me a comment below to tell me what you think. I’d love to hear your thoughts.

 

 

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HELP: Join seams with Kitchener Stitch

Would you like a seamless way to join you knitting seams? Here's our free guide to KitchenerOh seaming ( or Linking )!

I’m not a fan of joining any seam by hand, but if you can get an invisible seam, at least that makes the join look nice.

Kitchener is actually really easy, but it tends to confuse people because of that funny line of the yarn, picking up half stitches here and there. Well let me help you join you seams with that invisible line using this step by step, how to guide. it’s completely free and ready for you to download.

Download PDF HERE: Kitchener stitch

 

SHARE THE KNITTY LOVE: These guides are all free and here to help you. Share the love. Click the buttons below to tell someone about it or leave me a comment below to tell me what you think. I’d love to hear your thoughts.

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HELP: Grade your knitting patterns

Have you ever wondered how to grade a knitting pattern? I'll give you the rules from the fashion industry to help you grade your knitting pattern for both hand and machine knittingDo you want to grade your knitting patterns? Are you a bit confused by the rules? Well over a very long time in the fashion industry, I’ve had to write knitwear specs, go to fit meetings, speak to the manufacturers and make knitwear designs for the highstreet. This involves a lot of grading, measurements and calculations. So I think I have a pretty good grasp of providing you grade rules 🙂

Well over the years I don’t think that I’ve met someone with a ‘normal’ or ‘average’ body. We are all different, including my 5’2′ curvy frame. But what do we do? Retailers have to use some kind of rule to make garments bigger and smaller for their customers, so that’s where the grade rules come in.

As well as giving you the ‘average’ measurements, I explain how it all works and some points to think about for customising your own set of grade rules.

So firstly it’s really key to note that woven and jersey/knit specifications and grade rules are different. This guide will not work for woven garments. Jersey or knit garments have much smaller measurements than woven items.

Download PDF HERE: Gradient Rules

 

SHARE THE KNITTY LOVE: These guides are all free and here to help you. Share the love. Click the buttons below to tell someone about it or leave me a comment below to tell me what you think. I’d love to hear your thoughts.

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HELP: Fix a Purl stitch

Do you need some help on how to fix your stitches? If you've dropped a stitch on a knitting machine or on your on your knitting needles, then here is how to fix themWe’ve all been there. Dropped a stitch on a knitting machine or 10 rows ago on our knitting needles and have no idea how to fix them other than ripping the rows back.

Well that is time consuming and completely pointless. If you hand or machine knit, the method is the same. If you are using a latch tool or a crochet hook, you can fix those stitches just by picking up the ladders and slipping them in a particular way to create a knit stitch.

I can’t tell you how many times I’ve had to fix a dropped stitch and it’s so easy, I had to share the How To guide. I’ve put together a pdf for both knit and purl stitches. This one is for purl stitches. You can download that guide below.

Download PDF HERE: Dropped_Stitches_purl

 

SHARE THE KNITTY LOVE: These guides are all free and here to help you. Share the love. Click the buttons below to tell someone about it or leave me a comment below to tell me what you think. I’d love to hear your thoughts.

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HELP: Fix a Knit stitch

Do you need some help on how to fix your stitches? If you've dropped a stitch on a knitting machine or on your on your knitting needles, then here is how to fix themWe’ve all been there. Dropped a stitch on a knitting machine or 10 rows ago on our knitting needles and have no idea how to fix them other than ripping the rows back.

Well that is time consuming and completely pointless. If you hand or machine knit, the method is the same. If you are using a latch tool or a crochet hook, you can fix those stitches just by picking up the ladders and slipping them in a particular way to create a knit stitch.

I can’t tell you how many times I’ve had to fix a dropped stitch and it’s so easy, I had to share the How To guide. I’ve put together a pdf for both knit and purl stitches. This one is for knit stitches. You can download that guide below.

Download PDF HERE: Dropped_Stitches_knit

 

SHARE THE KNITTY LOVE: These guides are all free and here to help you. Share the love. Click the buttons below to tell someone about it or leave me a comment below to tell me what you think. I’d love to hear your thoughts.

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HK HELP: SSK [Slip Slip Knit]

What is SSK? It means Slip Slip Knit and is a method of decreasing knitting stitches. Come and get your free guideIf you’re not sure what SSK means, it refers to a method of decreasing stitches in a knitting pattern. A K2tog will do the same thing, but the in the opposite direction.

So when you have 2 stitches and you K2tog, you’ll notice that the top stitch, that shows when you are looking at the right side of the knitting, is angled to the right. A SSK which stands for Slip Slip Knit, does exactly the same thing but it moves the stitches before you knit them together so that the top stitch angles to the left.

It’s a really easy technique that is essential for designing your own knits and especially if you want to angle or move the stitches in a particular direction. Download our free SSK guide below for a step by step guide on how to do it.

Download PDF HERE: SSK

 

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MK HELP: Holding Stitches

Holding stitches is a great technique for your machine. It's also how you do partial knitting with laceHolding stitches is a really great technique for any machine knitter. Make no mistake it will make a really big difference to you when you are partial knitting.

Sometimes you get that furry effect on your knitting when you are holding some of the other stitches. Have you ever noticed that? Well this is the technique to make sure you are not pilling the rest of your work.

Now depending on your machine, this is also the way to do partial knitting with lace. Unlike other types of knitting, if you are using a lace carriage, you will find it really difficult to put the needles into holding position and move the lace carriage over them, sometime impossible. Well this is how you do it.

Come and download our step by step guide to Holding stitches below.

Download PDF HERE: Holding Stitch

 

SHARE THE KNITTY LOVE: These guides are all free and here to help you. Share the love. Click the buttons below to tell someone about it or leave me a comment below to tell me what you think. I’d love to hear your thoughts.

 

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